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by means of which humans may visit the sources of the hail, the floodgates of the rains, and the workshops of the thunderbolts.

Original French:  moyenant laquelle pourront les humains viſiter les ſources des greſles, les bondes des pluyes, & l’officine des fouldres.

Modern French:  moyenant laquelle pourront les humains visiter les sources des gresles, les bondes des pluyes, & l’officine des fouldres.


The editor Charles Esmangart (d. 1793) noted that Rabelais predicts the invention of airplanes. [1]

1. Rabelais, François (ca. 1483–1553), Œuvres de Rabelais (Edition Variorum). Tome Cinquième. Charles Esmangart, editor. Paris: Chez Dalibon, 1823. (note)


Notes

Visit the sources of the hail

Flying machine

J. J. Grandville
Un Autre Monde
1844
Ptak Science Books

bonde

A bung, or stopple; also, a sluce, or floudgate; and hence, also, the yate-stang, or beame thats pulled up, when a mill is to be set agate.

Lascher la bonde à. To give liberty, or free pillage, unto a violent thing.

Randle Cotgrave [–1634?]
A Dictionarie of the French and English Tongue
London: Adam Islip, 1611
PBM

officine

A workhouse, or shop.

Randle Cotgrave [–1634?]
A Dictionarie of the French and English Tongue
London: Adam Islip, 1611
PBM

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Posted 10 February 2013. Modified 30 November 2016.

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