Fragment 500369

PREVIOUS

NEXT

eupatoria, from King Eupator;

Original French:  Eupatoire, du roy Eupator:

Modern French:  Eupatoire, du roy Eupator:


Among the plants named from those who first invented, discovered, cultivated, domesticated, or appropriated them.

Rabelais also refers to eupatoria in Chapter 49, where its leaves are said to so resemble those of Pantagruelion, that several herbalists having called it domestic, have said eupatoria is wild Pantagruelion.


Notes

Eupatorium cannabinum

Eupatorium cannabinum
Plate caption: Eupatorium adulterinum
Kunigunt kraut

Eupatorium cannabinum L.
English: hemp agrimony
French: eupatoire
German: Wasserdostkraut

Fuchs, Leonhart (1501 – 1566), De historia stirpium commentarii insignes…. Basil: In Officina Isingriniana, 1542. p. 265. Smithsonian Library

Eupatorium (text)

Eupatorium (text)

Meydenbach, Jacob, Ortus Sanitatis. Mainz, Germany: 1491. 80v. University of Cambridge Digital Library

Eupatorium

Eupatorium

Meydenbach, Jacob, Ortus Sanitatis. Mainz, Germany: 1491. 80v. University of Cambridge Digital Library

Eupatoria

Water-agrimony (Sweet-maudlin). Pliny xxv. 6, § 29. Eupator was king of Syria, son on Antiochus Epiphanes.

Rabelais, François (ca. 1483–1553), The Five Books and Minor Writings. Volume 1: Books I-III. William Francis Smith (1842–1919), translator. London: Alexader P. Watt, 1893. Internet Archive

Mithridates

Ipsi Mithridati Crateuas adscripsit unam, mithridatiam vocatam (huic folia duo a radice acantho similia, caulis inter utraque sustinens roseum florem).

To Mithridates himself Crateuas ascribed one plant, called mithridatia. It has two leaves, like those of the acanthus, springing from the root, with a stem between them which supports a rose-pink flower.

Pliny the Elder (23–79 AD), The Natural History. Volume 7: Books 24–27. William Henry Samuel Jones (1876–1963), translator. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1956. 25.026. Loeb Classical Library

eupatorium

Eupatoria quoque regiam auctoritatem habet, caulis lignosi, nigricantis, hirsuti, cubitalis et aliquando amplioris, foliis per intervalla quinquefolii aut cannabis per extremitates incisis quinquepertito, nigris et ipsis plumosisque, radice supervacua. semen dysintericis in vino potum auxiliatur unice.

Eupatoria [Eupator was a surname of Mithridates VI, King of Pontus. See § 62 and XXXIII. § 151.] too enjoys the prestige of a royal discoverer. It has a ligneous stem, dark, hairy, and a cubit or sometimes more in height; the leaves, arranged at intervals, are like those of cinquefoil or hemp, and have five indentations along the edge; they too are dark and feathery. The root is useless, but the seed taken in wine is a sovereign remedy in cases of dysentery.

Pliny the Elder (23–79 AD), The Natural History. Volume 7: Books 24–27. William Henry Samuel Jones (1876–1963), translator. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1956. 25.029. Loeb Classical Library

Eupatoria

« Eupatoria quoque regiam auctoritatem habet. » Pline XXV, 29. On a dédié à Mithridate Eupator, roi de Pont : 1° l’Eupatoire d’Avicenne, Eupatorium cannabinum, L. 2° l’Eupatoire de Mésuë, Achillea ageratum, L. 3° l’Aigremoine, Agrimonia eupatoria, L., qui, pour Sprengel, est la véritable Eupatoire de Dioscoride. Cependant, l’Eupatoire décrite par Pline, et vantée par Galien, Paul d’Égine, Avicenne, est l’E. cannabinum. (Paul Delaunay)

Rabelais, François (ca. 1483–1553), Oeuvres. Édition critique. Tome Cinquieme: Tiers Livre. Abel Lefranc (1863-1952), editor. Paris: Librairie Ancienne Honoré Champion, 1931. p. 347. Internet Archive

eupatorium

a weed named for King Eupator of Pompus.

Rabelais, François (ca. 1483–1553), Complete works of Rabelais. Jacques LeClercq (1891–1971), translator. New York: Modern Library, 1936.

eupatoire

Mithridate Eupator, roi du Pont, en Asie Miuneuyre (Pline, XXV, xxix)

Rabelais, François (ca. 1483–1553), Œuvres complètes. Mireille Huchon, editor. Paris: Gallimard, 1994. p. 503, n. 8.

PREVIOUS

NEXT

Posted 10 February 2013. Modified 4 July 2017.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *