Fragment 500363

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Armois from Artemis, who is Diana;

Original French:  Armoiſe, de Artemis, qui eſt Diane:

Modern French:  Armoise, de Artemis, qui est Diane:



Notes

Arthemisia

Arthemisia

Ortus sanitatis. Mainz, Germany: Jacob Meydenbach, 1491. 19r. University of Cambridge Digital Library

Arthemisia (text)

Arthemisia (text)
Partial text.

Ortus sanitatis. Mainz, Germany: Jacob Meydenbach, 1491. 19r. University of Cambridge Digital Library

Artemisia

artemisia
Artemisia

Laguna, Andres (ca. 1511 – 1559), Annotationes in Dioscoridem Anazarbeum … iuxta vetustissimorum codicum fidem elaboratae.. Lyon: Apud Gulielmum Rovillium, 1554. Smithsonian Libraries

Leto Giving Birth to Apollo and Diana

Leto Giving Birth to Apollo and Diana
Leto Giving Birth to Apollo and Diana on the Island of Delos
1560s
Engraving, 407 x 560 mm
National Gallery of Art, Washington

This engraving was executed after a preparatory drawing for a painting of the same subject by Giulio Romano. The theme is taken from Ovid’s Metamorphosis: Leto, a lover of Jupiter, is at rest after giving birth to the twins Apollo and Diana on the island of Delos where she sought refuge to escape from Juno’s jealousy.

Scultori, Diana (ca. 1547-1612), Leto Giving Birth to Apollo and Diana on the Island of Delos. Web Gallery of Art

Armoise

Artemesia (Mug-Wort, or Mother-wort) from Queen Artemisia, or from Diana, who was likewise called Artemis.

Rabelais, François (ca. 1483–1553), The Works of Francis Rabelais, M.D. The Third Book. Now carefully revised, and compared throughout with the late new edition of M. Le du Chat. John Ozell (d. 1743), editor. London: J. Brindley, 1737.

Armoise

Mugwort, from Artemisia or Artemis. Pliny xxv. 7 § 36.

Rabelais, François (ca. 1483–1553), The Five Books and Minor Writings. Volume 1: Books I-III. William Francis Smith (1842–1919), translator. London: Alexader P. Watt, 1893. Internet Archive

artemisia

Mulieres quoque hanc gloriam adfectavere, in quibus Artemisia uxor Mausoli adoptata herba quae antea parthenis vocabatur. sunt qui ab Artemide Ilithyia cognominatam putent, quoniam privatim medeatur feminarum malis. est autem absinthii modo fruticosa, maioribus foliis pinguibusque. ipsius duo genera: altera altior latioribus foliis, altera tenera tenuioribus, et non nisi in maritimis nascens. sunt qui in mediterraneis eodem nomine appellent, simplici caule, minimis foliis, floris copiosi erumpentis cum uva maturescit, odore non iniucundo. quam quidam botryn, alii ambrosiam vocant, talis in Cappadocia nascitur.

Women too have been ambitious to gain this distinction, among them Artemisia, the wife of Mausolus, who gave her name to a plant which before was called parthenis. There are some who think that the surname is derived from Artemis Ilithyia, because the plant is specific for the troubles of women. It is also bushy, resembling wormwood, but with larger and fleshy leaves. Of the plant itself there are two kinds: one higher and with broader leaves, the other soft and with more slender leaves, growing only near the sea-side. There are some who in inland districts call by the same name a plant with a single stem, very small leaves, abundant blossom bursting out when the grapes are ripening, and with a not unpleasant smell. The sort that some call botrys, and others ambrosia, grows in Cappadocia.

Pliny the Elder (23–79 AD), The Natural History. Volume 7: Books 24–27. William Henry Samuel Jones (1876–1963), translator. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1956. 25.036. Loeb Classical Library

armoise, de Artemis

Rabelais la place sous l’invocation d’Artémis, ou Diane Ilithya. D’autres, comme A. Paré, veulent qu’il s’agisse d’Artémise, reine de Carie: « Artemisia, uxor Mausoli, adoptata herba quæ antea parthenis vocabatur », dit Pline, XXV, 36. — Dioscorides ne décrit pas moins de quatre artemisia, que Fée rapporte à nos A. campestris, L., A. camphorata, Vill., A. pontica, L., A. chamæmelifolia, Vill. Ce sont des plantes amères, stomachiques, aromatiques, emménagogues, d’un usage thérapeutique fort ancien. (Paul Delaunay)

Rabelais, François (ca. 1483–1553), Oeuvres. Édition critique. Tome Cinquieme: Tiers Livre. Abel Lefranc (1863-1952), editor. Paris: Librairie Ancienne Honoré Champion, 1931. p. 347. Internet Archive

Ambroise Paré

Ambroise Paré, né vers 1510 au Bourg-Hersent, près de Laval, et mort 1590 à Paris, est un chirurgien et anatomiste français.
In 1552, Paré was accepted into royal service of the Valois Dynasty under Henry II; he was however unable to cure the king’s fatal blow to the head, which he received during a tournament in 1559. Paré stayed in the service of the Kings of France to the end of his life in 1590, serving Henry II, Francis II, Charles IX, and Henry III.

Wikipédia (Fr.). Wikipédia

artemesia

Thus artemesia, wormwood or mugwort, named for Artemys Diana, or possibly, for Artemys, Queen of Caria, wife to Mausolus.

Rabelais, François (ca. 1483–1553), Complete works of Rabelais. Jacques LeClercq (1891–1971), translator. New York: Modern Library, 1936.

Armoise, de Artemis, qui est Diane

Pour certains, comme Ambroise Paré, il s’agirait d’Artémise, reine de Caire (voir Tiers livre, éd Lefranc, n. 15, p. 347.

Rabelais, François (ca. 1483–1553), Œuvres complètes. Mireille Huchon, editor. Paris: Gallimard, 1994. p. 503, n. 7.

Artemis

Artemis was one of the most widely venerated of the Ancient Greek deities. Her Roman equivalent is Diana. Some scholars believe that the name, and indeed the goddess herself, was originally pre-Greek. Homer refers to her as Artemis Agrotera, Potnia Theron: “Artemis of the wildland, Mistress of Animals”. In the classical period of Greek mythology, Artemis was often described as the daughter of Zeus and Leto, and the twin sister of Apollo. She was the Hellenic goddess of the hunt, wild animals, wilderness, childbirth, virginity and protector of young girls, bringing and relieving disease in women; she often was depicted as a huntress carrying a bow and arrows.

Wikipedia. Wikipedia

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Posted 27 January 2013. Modified 17 June 2017.

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