Fragment 500847

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buglosse, the tongue of an ox;

Original French:  Bugloſſe, a langue de Beuf:

Modern French:  Buglosse, à langue de Beuf:


Among the plants named by similitude.


Notes

Buglossa

Buglossa

Schöffer, Peter (ca. 1425–ca. 1502.), [R]ogatu plurimo[rum] inopu[m] num[m]o[rum] egentiu[m] appotecas refuta[n]tiu[m] occasione illa, q[uia] necessaria ibide[m] ad corp[us] egru[m] specta[n]tia su[n]t cara simplicia et composita. Mainz: 1484. Plate 24. Botanicus

Ancusa

Ancusa

Ortus sanitatis. Mainz, Germany: Jacob Meydenbach, 1491. 17r. University of Cambridge Digital Library

Ancusa (text)

Ancusa (text)

Ortus sanitatis. Mainz, Germany: Jacob Meydenbach, 1491. 17r. University of Cambridge Digital Library

Buglossa

Buglossa

Ortus sanitatis. Mainz, Germany: Jacob Meydenbach, 1491. 37r. University of Cambridge Digital Library

Buglossa (text)

Buglossa (text)

Ortus sanitatis. Mainz, Germany: Jacob Meydenbach, 1491. 37r. University of Cambridge Digital Library

buglosse

De βούνλοσσζ, langue de bœuf: mot composé de βοϋζ[?], bœuf, et γλωσσα, langue.

Rabelais, François (ca. 1483–1553), Œuvres de Rabelais (Edition Variorum). Tome Cinquième. Charles Esmangart (1736–1793), editor. Paris: Chez Dalibon, 1823. p. 270. Google Books

bugloss

Nicander, Theriaca 541. Consider now the excellent root of albicius’s bugloss: its prickly leaves grow ever thick upon it.

Nicander (2nd century BC), Theriaca.

Bugloss

Pliny xxv. 8, § 40.

Rabelais, François (ca. 1483–1553), The Five Books and Minor Writings. Volume 1: Books I-III. William Francis Smith (1842–1919), translator. London: Alexader P. Watt, 1893. Internet Archive

buglosse

Iungitur huic buglossos boum linguae similis, cui praecipuum quod in vinum deiecta animi voluptates auget, et vocatur euphrosynum.

Akin to the plantain is buglossos, which is like the tongue of an ox. The most conspicuous quality of this is that thrown into wine it increases the exhilarating effect, and so it is also called euphrosynum, the plant that cheers.

Pliny the Elder (23–79 AD), The Natural History. Volume 7: Books 24–27. William Henry Samuel Jones (1876–1963), translator. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1956. 25.040. Loeb Classical Library

buglossse

De βονζ, bœuf, γλωσσα, langue, allusion à l’aspect des feuilles: «bouglossos, boum linguæ similem,» dit Pline, XXV, 40. La buglosse de Pline est, pour Sprengel et Cazin, notre vulgaire bourrache, Borrago officinalis, L.; pour Fée, Anchisa paniculata, Ait. Sainéan (H. N. R., 122) rapporte la buglosse de Rabelais à Anchusa italica, Retz.

Rabelais, François (ca. 1483–1553), Oeuvres. Édition critique. Tome Cinquieme: Tiers Livre. Abel Lefranc (1863-1952), editor. Paris: Librairie Ancienne Honoré Champion, 1931. p. 355. Internet Archive

pas similitude

Toutes ces plantes, dans De latinis nominibus, sauf pour le delphinium.

Rabelais, François (ca. 1483–1553), Le Tiers Livre. Edition critique. Michael A. Screech (b. 1926), editor. Paris-Genève: Librarie Droz, 1964.

Buglosse

De βοῦζ, «bœuf», et , γλὡσσα, «langue» (Pline, XXV, xl).

Rabelais, François (ca. 1483–1553), Œuvres complètes. Mireille Huchon, editor. Paris: Gallimard, 1994. p. 505, n. 4.

buglosse

bugloss. Forms: buglosse, buglose, buglos), bugloss. [adopted from French buglosse: Latin buglossa, adaptation of Greek bouglwssoj, formed on bouj ox + glwssa tongue, from the shape and roughness of the leaves.]

A name applied to several boraginaceous plants, particularly the small, corn, or field bugloss (Lycopsis or Anchusa arvensis); viper’s bugloss (Echium vulgare), and other species of Echium; also by some old herbalists to Helminthia echioides, prickly ox-tongue.

1533 Sir Thomas Elyot The castel of helth (1541) 11 Cynamome: Saffron… Buglosse: Borage.

1542 Boorde Dyetary xix, The rootes of Borage and Buglosse soden tender… doth ingender good blode.

1605 Ben Jonson Volpone iii. iv. 61 A little muske, dri’d mints, Buglosse, and barley-meale.

1699 John Evelyn Acetaria, or a discourse of sallets 14 What we now call Bugloss, was not that of the Ancients.


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Posted 22 January 2013. Modified 21 June 2017.

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