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use certain cataractic instruments

Original French:  vſent de certains inſtrumens catharactes

Modern French:  usent de certains instrumens catharactes


instrumens cataractes

Instrument qui bruise, rompt, broie le chanvre, une broye: du grec χαταράσσσ, frango, rumpo, d’où cataracta, herse de porte sarrazine.

François Rabelais [ca. 1483-ca. 1553]
Œuvres de Rabelais (Edition Variorum)
Charles Esmangart [1736-1793], editor
Paris: Chez Dalibon, 1823
Google Books

instrumens catharactes

Outils pour briser. Néologism, du grec χαταρρηγνυναι, même sens.

François Rabelais [ca. 1483-ca. 1553]
Oeuvres. Tome Cinquieme: Tiers Livre
Abel Lefranc, editor
Paris: Librairie Ancienne Honoré Champion, 1931
Archive.org

catharactes

Broyeurs (mot formé sur le verbe grec χαταρρηγνυναι)

François Rabelais [ca. 1483-ca. 1553]
Œuvres
L. Jacob, editor
Paris: Charpentier, 1857
Google Books

Cathartique

Cathartique. A purgative, or evacuative; a purging medicine.

Randle Cotgrave [–1634?]
A Dictionarie of the French and English Tongue
London: Adam Islip, 1611
PBM

cataracte

Chute d’eau sur le cours d’un fleuve.


Cataracte

Cataracte: A violent fall of waters from a high and steepe place; also, a strong yron-bound chest, open in the top and set with pikes in the bottome, thereby to sticke fast, and steadily where it is to stand; (used especially in water-workes;) also, a Cataract, or web in the eye.

Randle Cotgrave [–1634?]
A Dictionarie of the French and English Tongue
London: Adam Islip, 1611
PBM

cataract

From Greek, a waterfall, also a portcullis (as adj., down-rushing) : either (1) break down, rush down; or (2) dash down, break in pieces, from down plus strike hard, dash in pieces.
A descent of water over a steeply sloping surface; any furious downpour of water; a diesase of the eye; in fort., a herse.

William D. Whitney
Century Dictionary
1895
Dicfro

herse

A framework composed of bars or rods, and used for any purpose. A grating.
In fort., specifically, A portcullis. A frame armed with spikes, used for chevaux-de-frise, and laid in the way or in breaches, with the points turned up, to obstruct the advance of an enemy.

William D. Whitney
Century Dictionary
1895
Dicfro

portcullis

porte colice, a sliding gate. In fortifications, a strong grating of timber or iron, somewhat resembling a harrow, made to slide in vertical grooves in the jambs of the entrance gate of a fortified place, to protect the gate in case of assault. The vertical bar were made of iron or of wood pointed with iron at the bottom, n order to demolish whatever the portcullis might fall upon.

William D. Whitney
Century Dictionary
1895
Dicfro

portcullis

portcullis

William D. Whitney
Century Dictionary
1895
Dicfro

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Posted 7 February 2013. Modified 8 November 2015.

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