Fragment 490382

PREVIOUS

NEXT

betony,

Original French:  Betoine:

Modern French:  Betoine:


Among plants in some way similar to Pantagruelion, referred to throughout Chapter 49.

The leaves of Pantagruelion are incised all around, like those of betony.


Notes

Betonica

Betonica
Plate 25

Schöffer, Peter (ca. 1425–ca. 1502.), [R]ogatu plurimo[rum] inopu[m] num[m]o[rum] egentiu[m] appotecas refuta[n]tiu[m] occasione illa, q[uia] necessaria ibide[m] ad corp[us] egru[m] specta[n]tia su[n]t cara simplicia et composita. Mainz: 1484. Botanicus

Betonica

Betonica

Ortus sanitatis. Mainz, Germany: Jacob Meydenbach, 1491. 30v. University of Cambridge Digital Library

Betonica (text)

Betonica (text)

Ortus sanitatis. Mainz, Germany: Jacob Meydenbach, 1491. 31r. University of Cambridge Digital Library

Stachys officinalis

Stachys officinalis
Stachys officinalis (L.) Trevis. [as Betonica]

Clusius, Carolus (1526-1609), Rariorum plantarum historia vol. 1. Antverpiae: Joannem Moretum, 1601. Plantillustrations.org

Stachys betonienkraut

Stachys betonienkraut
Stachys betonienkraut [as Betonica betonienkraut]

Merian, Matthäus (1593–1650), Fruchtbringenden Gesellschaft. 1646. Plantillustrations.org

betony

Pliny 25.46.84 The Vettones in Spain discovered the plant called vettonica in Gaul, serratula (“the plant with leaves like a saw”) in Italy, and cestros or psychotrophon by the Greeks, a plant more highly valued than any other. It springs up with an angular stem of two cubits, spreading out from the root leaves rather like those of lapathum, serrated, and with a purple fruiting-head.

Pliny the Elder (23–79 AD), The Natural History. Volume 7: Books 24–27. William Henry Samuel Jones (1876–1963), translator. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1956. 25.046. Loeb Classical Library

betoine

[or as the Saxifragum] This is added by the Translator [Urquhart], The author only says, as Betony.

Rabelais, François (ca. 1483–1553), The Works of Francis Rabelais, M.D. The Third Book. Now carefully revised, and compared throughout with the late new edition of M. Le du Chat. John Ozell (d. 1743), editor. London: J. Brindley, 1737. p. 337.

betoine

Mauvais compatison ; qu’il sagisse ici de Betonica officinalis L., l’a plus réputée dans l’ancienne thétapeutique, ou de B. alopecuros L. comme le pense M. Sainéan (H.N.R., p. 104) ; bétoine a des feuilles crénelées, tandis que les folioles du chanvre sont dentées. (Paul Delaunay)

Rabelais, François (ca. 1483–1553), Oeuvres. Édition critique. Tome Cinquieme: Tiers Livre. Abel Lefranc (1863-1952), editor. Paris: Librairie Ancienne Honoré Champion, 1931. p. 340. Internet Archive

betoine

Plante aux feuilles crénelées.

Rabelais, François (ca. 1483–1553), Œuvres complètes. Mireille Huchon, editor. Paris: Gallimard, 1994. p. 501, n. 7.

betony

Vettones in Hispania eam quae vettonica dicitur in Gallia, in Italia autem serratula, a Graecis cestros aut psychrotrophon, ante cunctas laudatissima. exit anguloso caule cubitorum duum e radice spargens folia fere lapathi, serrata, semine purpureo. folia siccantur in farinam plurimos ad usus. fit vinum ex ea et acetum stomacho et claritati oculorum, tantumque gloriae habet ut domus in qua sata sit tuta existimetur a periculis omnibus.

The Vettones in Spain discovered the plant called vettonica in Gaul, serratula [“The plant with leaves like a saw”] in Italy, and cestros or psychrotrophon by the Greeks, a plant more highly valued than any other. It springs up with an angular stem of two cubits, spreading out from the root leaves rather like those of lapathum, serrated, and with a purple fruiting-head. Its leaves are dried into a powder and used for very many purposes. From it are made a wine and a vinegar, good for the stomach and the eyesight. So great is its fame that the home in which it has been planted is considered to be safe from all danger

Pliny the Elder (23–79 AD), The Natural History. Volume 7: Books 24–27. William Henry Samuel Jones (1876–1963), translator. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1956. 25.046. Loeb Classical Library

betony

betony Forms: (1 betonice), 4-6 betone, 5 betan, batany, 5-6 betany, betayne, betonye, 6 bittonie, byten, bytone, betain(e, 6-7 betonie, 7 bettony, 5- betony. [adopted from French bétoine, adaptation of late Latin *betonia for betonica, written by Pliny (Natural History xxv. 46) vettonica, and said by him to be a Gaulish name for a plant discovered by a Spanish tribe called Vettones.]

A plant (Stachys Betonica) of the Labiate order, having spiked purple flowers and ovate crenate leaves. In former days medicinal and magical virtues were attributed to it.

[C. 1000 Leechdoms, Wortcunning, and Starcraft of Early England. II. 58 Wyl ón ealað..betonican. ]

A. 1275 in Thomas Wright and Richard Paul Wülcker, Anglo-Saxon and Old English Vocabularies (1884). 554 Bethonica, beteine.

C. 1375 ? Barbour St. Baptista 760 In þe prouince of þe sare (= tzar?) … Quhare mene makis drink of spycery-Of betone þare is gret copy.

C. 1440 Promptorium parvulorium sive cleriucorum 34 Betayne, herbe [1499 batany or betony], betonica.

1483 Catholicon Anglicum 30 Betan, harba.

1519 William Horman Vulgaria in Promptorium parvulorum sive clericorum 34 Nesynge is caused with byten (betonica) thrust in the nostril.

1586 Cogan Haven Health lxxiii. (1636) 79 Betaine, though it grow wilde, yet it is set in many Gardens.

1621 Burton Anatomy of Melancholy. iii. iv. ii. vi. (1676) 721 All which [herbs] … expel Devils … The Emperour Augustus … approves of Betony to this purpose.


betony

Crenate – having the edge notched or toothed with rounded teeth, finely scalloped.

Editor, Pantagruelion. Pantagruelion

PREVIOUS

NEXT

Posted 15 January 2013. Modified 18 June 2017.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *